Inside the Toshiba NB10 – removing the back cover (teardown)

It’s reasonably easy to get the back cover off the NB10 without damaging anything if you are careful and patient.

The only tools needed are an M2 (small phillips) screwsdriver, and a soft plastic tool for prizing plastic apart (“spudger”) – I used an old plastic ruler. If you use a tool made from soft plastic, you will avoid marking the NB10’s case at all and there will be no sign it has ever been open.

Helpfully, all the screws are the same (M2XL5), so there’s no need to keep a separate record of where each one came from. You can put them all in one container as you go.

The first step is to switch the NB10 off and turn it over. Unplug the charger, undo the two battery screws and remove the battery.

You can then remove the four screws along the front, and the other three – two beside the VGA and ethernet ports, and one near the battery.

Remove the screw which holds the disk & RAM cover down and lift & remove the cover:

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Once the cover is removed, undo the screw on the right which retains the disk, and pull the disk out:

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Then undo the two screws above and below the disk:

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The last screws to remove are hiding under the rear rubber feet, next to the battery. Carefully remove the feet with the point of a sharp plastic tool and undo the screws:

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Now that all of the screws are out, insert your plastic tool into the gap between the two halves of the plastic shell. Underneath the VGA connector is a good place to start this.

Run the tool gently around the edge of the laptop, pressing the two sides apart. There is plenty of flex in the plastic so don’t be afraid to pull at it a little. When you reach one of the clips which hold the halves together, put the plastic tool against it and push inwards to free it.

Once all the clips are loosened and your tool runs freely along the outside edge of the NB10 right up to the battery space, you’re ready to pull the two halves apart.

Having repeated the disassembly on a colleague’s machine, there might be an easier way than this. it appears that if you gently pull the two halves of the base apart, starting in the battery compartment, you may not need the plastic tool at all.

Although there is no actual adhesive used, the holes for the speakers in the rear cover fit quite snugly around the speakers and tend to stop the halves from separating. You may find it useful to flex the case around the wrist-rest and press it down in the centre of the wrist rest while you pull the rear cover away gently.

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The interesting part:

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  • No fan, just a heatsink.
  • Mini-PCIE WLAN card is a QCWB335 (combined Wifi 802.11b/g/n 1×1 and Bluetooth 4.0) with both antennas connected – nice to see in a low-end laptop.
  • Space only permits a half-size Mini-PCIE card to be used.

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Reassembly is simple – just press the two halves back together and re-insert the screws.

 

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2 thoughts on “Inside the Toshiba NB10 – removing the back cover (teardown)

  1. Hello once again!

    Look, I have a little problem here! I noticed that my “x” key is messed up. Apparently it popped off when I was typing yesterday and, with a little effort I managed to put it in its place and it eventually seemed like it was okay again. However, today I realized that, although it is still attached to the keyboard, the key gets kind of inclined… I don’t really know what to do about it…! Do you know if there is any way to solve the problem at home? Or will I have to leave it to specialized technician at the store I bought the pc?

    Thank you in advance.

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